REVIVE Naloxone Training

REVIVE! is the Opioid Overdose and Naloxone Education (ONE) program for the Commonwealth of Virginia. REVIVE! provides training to professionals, stakeholders, and others on how to recognize and respond to an opioid overdose emergency with the administration of naloxone (Narcan ®). REVIVE! is a collaborative effort led by the Virginia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services (DBHDS) working alongside the Virginia Department of Health, the Virginia Department of Health Professions, recovery community organizations such as the McShin Foundation, OneCare of Southwest Virginia, the Substance Abuse and Addiction Recovery Alliance of Virginia (SAARA), and other stakeholders. We, at the McShin Foundation are offering this training free of charge on October 7th, 2016 at 6pm.

More about Prescription Drug Use in Virginia…..

Virginia has been severely impacted by opioid abuse, particularly the abuse of prescription drugs. In 1999, the first year for which such data is available, approximately 23 people died from abuse of fentanyl, hydrocodone, methadone, and oxycodone (the leading prescription opioids abused, commonly referred to as FHMO). By 2013, the most recent year for which complete data is available, 386 individuals died from the abuse of FHMO, an increase of 1,578%, with fentanyl being the primary substance fueling this increase. In 2013 alone, there was an increase of more than 100% in deaths attributed to fentanyl use. In 2013, as before in 2011, drug-related deaths happened at a higher per capita level (11.0 deaths per 100,000) than motor vehicle crashes (10.1 per 100,000).

REVIVE-FHMOchart

The 2013 data provides evidence of other disturbing trends in Virginia, including a sharp rise in heroin deaths. In 2010, only 49 deaths in Virginia were attributed to heroin use. By 2013, that figure had risen to 213, an increase of 334% in only four years, while cocaine deaths remained relatively level.

REVIVE-CocHerchart

The changes in drug-related deaths in Virginia in 2013 are not limited to which substances had the greatest impact. The geography of the opioid epidemic in Virginia is shifting as well. In past years, the Western portion of Virginia typically accounted for approximately one-third of drug-related deaths in any given year. In 2013, for the first time since these records have been maintained, the prevalence of drug-related deaths was spread evenly over the Commonwealth, as the Eastern region of Virginia saw an increase of more than 51% in drug-related deaths in a single year, from 2012 to 2013.

Naloxone, a prescription medication, is an opioid antagonist drug that reverses the effects that opioids have in the brain. When a person overdoses on opioids, the opioid overwhelms specific receptors in the brain, slowly decreasing respiration and heart rate before finally stopping it altogether. Naloxone has a very high affinity for these receptors and effectively pushes the opioid off of the brain receptor. This action allows a person’s body to resume respiration and respiration. Naloxone has been used for years by emergency medical technicians and emergency room doctors to reverse opioid overdose emergencies. Outside of this singular purpose, naloxone has no effect on the body, and poses no danger to anyone who accidentally administers it to themselves or someone else.

Naloxone is a proven public health response to the epidemic of opioid overdose emergencies. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention indicate that since 1996, when the first program to distribute naloxone to Lay Rescuers (REVIVE!’s terminology for community members who have been trained on naloxone administration) was implemented, 152,283 persons received training on administering naloxone. Those individuals have saved 26,463 lives by administering naloxone to individuals who were experiencing an opioid overdose emergency.